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Rowley House

Our aim is to give nature a home and create a place of beauty. There is a formal courtyard garden and informal gardens featuring rare trees, and herbaceous borders, a pond with swamp cypress and woodland walk with maples, rhododendrons, ferns and shade-loving plants. Beyond the garden there are wildflower meadows, natural ponds and a wood with ancient oaks. Also wood sculptures by Andy Burgess.

Owner Info

Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House
Rowley House

About Rowley House

At Rowley House garden there is much to see. Your first experience is the Court Yard Garden, a formal area with three “rooms” designed by Sue Davies of Outside Rooms. The rooms feature and frame, firstly, an elegant sculpture by Ian Gill – “Dragon’s Eye’ and an original ancient pump found on the site. Also around the courtyard garden are some unusual trees – amongst these are a blue Noble Fir, a Weeping Atlantic Cedar, a red-coned Norway Spruce and a Golden Oriental Spruce – and mixed herbaceous borders which add beautiful and vivid colour.
Leaving the courtyard, take the “Woodland Walk” passing a large narrow-leaved Ash, Japanese Maples, rhododendrons, ferns and other shade-loving plants. You will see a huge and magnificent Weeping Beech, a Ginkgo, a Brewer’s Weeping Spruce, Handkerchief tree, Tulip tree and Amur Cork tree and also note a small bed of wildflowers.
Walking around the original lower pond you see the Swamp Cypress growing happily on the island, and through its leaves glimpse a sight of the obelisk; and pass the sweet-scented Japanese Clethera surrounded by rhododendrons. Also featured is a little bridge to the island.
The main lawn is flanked by herbaceous borders and various unusual trees including a Metasequoia Gold Rush, a Kentucky coffee tree and a Japanese pergola tree. Interesting features include two wood sculptures by Any Burgess – a merlin on the summerhouse and on the lawn is a Red Kite.
Beyond the original pond is Park Meadow with a naturalised pond surrounded by a wild flower meadow, sown and managed to maintain the maximum variety of species. Pass through a field with mature trees – large maples, beautifully shaped limes and a smaller Shag Bark Hickory – to the Marl Pit Wood. Follow the path past water-filled marl pits observing a number of ancient oaks; also find Aspen, Weeping Silver Limes, Japanese maples, and newly planted hydrangeas and shrub roses; then continue through a further wild flower meadow. Notice also, across the pond an amazing wood sculpture of an Eurasian Eagle Owl, landing again by Andy Burgess. Return through Park meadow past a Wingnut tree and thence back into the garden to the teas and home-made cakes.

Location details

Rowley House,
Holmes Chapel,
Cheshire,
CW4 8DX

Directions to Rowley House
J18 M6 to Holmes Chapel, then take A535 (Macclesfield). Take R turn in Twemlow (Swettenham) at Yellow Broom restaurant. Rowley House ½m on L.

Rowley House openings

This garden has now completed its National Garden Scheme openings for this year.

Accessibility

  • Teas and part of the garden accesable, but not the wildlife meadows and wood.
  • Share this garden

Other Gardens of Potential Interest

FAQs

Yes, cashless payment is accepted.

Sorry, there is no available parking for coaches at Rowley House at this time.

Yes, dogs are welcome at Rowley House. Please keep the dogs on fixed short leads in the garden and keep in mind that you are responsible for controlling the dog’s behaviour. For any specific rules please ask the owners.

There are no plants for sale for the time being.

Sorry, Rowley House does not yet accommodate wheelchair users.

Yes. Rowley House seeks to offer a sustainable refuge for nearby fauna and wildlife. These sanctuaries host diverse habitats supporting indigenous flora and fauna and nurturing local biodiversity.